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Adobe roadmap for the Flash runtimes

By Rich Tretola | February 22, 20129,220 views

Are you curious what Adobe is planning for the future of the Flash runtime?

For the past decade, Flash Player and, more recently, Adobe AIR have played a vital role on the web by providing consistent platforms for deploying rich, expressive content across browsers, desktops, and devices. Beginning as a platform for enabling animation, the Flash runtimes have evolved into a complete multimedia platform, enabling experiences that were otherwise not possible or feasible on the web.

Looking forward, Adobe believes that Flash is particularly suited for addressing the gaming and premium video markets, and will focus its development efforts in those areas. At the same time, Adobe will make architectural and language changes to the runtimes in order to ensure that the Flash runtimes are well placed to enable the richest experiences on the web and across mobile devices for another decade.

Read more about the future of the Adobe Flash Runtime here.

OR

Download the PDF here

Topics: ActionScript 3, Adobe AIR, flash, Flash Player, Flex | No Comments »

Flex 4.6 Now Available

By Rich Tretola | November 29, 201112,886 views

The final official Adobe release of Flex is now available. Future versions will be part of the Apache project.

THE LINKS FOR DOWNLOADS ARE NOW ACTIVE!

Flex 4.6 : http://opensource.adobe.com/wiki/display/flexsdk/Download+Flex+4.6

Topics: Adobe AIR, Announcements, Flex | 4 Comments »

Apache Flex (Update from Adobe)

By Rich Tretola | November 16, 201114,636 views

The following was posted last night at http://blogs.adobe.com/flex/2011/11/your-questions-about-flex.html

What specifically is Adobe proposing?

We are preparing two proposals for incubating Flex SDK and BlazeDS at the Apache Software Foundation.

In addition to contributing the core Flex SDK (including automation and advanced data visualization components), Adobe also plans to donate the following:

Adobe will also have a team of Flex SDK engineers contributing to those new Apache projects as their full-time responsibility. Adobe has in-development work already started, including additional Spark-based components.

Isn’t Adobe just abandoning Flex SDK and putting it out to Apache to die?

Absolutely not – we are incredibly proud of what we’ve achieved with Flex and know that it will continue to provide significant value for many years to come. We expect active and on-going contributions from the Apache community. To be clear, Adobe plans on steadily contributing to the projects and we are working with the Flex community to make them contributors as well.

Flex has been open source since the release of Flex 3 SDK. What’s so different about what you are announcing now?

Since Flex 3, customers have primarily used the Flex source code to debug underlying issues in the Flex framework, rather than to actively develop new features or fix bugs and contribute them back to the SDK.

With Friday’s announcement, Adobe will no longer be the owner of the ongoing roadmap. Instead, the project will be in Apache and governed according to its well-established community rules. In this model, Apache community members will provide project leadership. We expect project management to include both Adobe engineers as well as key community leaders. Together, they will jointly operate in a meritocracy to define new features and enhancements for future versions of the Flex SDK. The Apache model has proven to foster a vibrant community, drive development forward, and allow for continuous commits from active developers.

How will the open source governance work? Where will it be hosted? Who will manage the project? Will Adobe still effectively control the Flex roadmap? How can I contribute?

We are actively working on getting the Flex SDK and BlazeDS projects accepted as incubator podlings at the Apache Software Foundation. We expect to have more information to share on progress in the next few weeks.

We are actively working with members of the Flex community to ensure they are involved in the project management along with Adobe engineers.

What guarantees can Adobe make in relation to Flex applications continuing to run on Flash Player and Adobe AIR?

Adobe will continue to support applications built with Flex, as well as all future versions of the SDK running in PC browsers with Adobe Flash Player and as mobile apps with Adobe AIR indefinitely on Apple iOS, Google Android and RIM BlackBerry Tablet OS.

How will open source Flex development continue against Flash Player and Adobe AIR?

Flex SDK development will continue against released versions of the Flash Player and Adobe AIR runtimes, providing a stable and supported environment for Flex applications.

You said Adobe is committed to Flash Builder – what exactly does that mean in the context of future Flex SDK support?

Future versions of Adobe Flash Builder will continue to provide code editing, compilation, debugging and profiling support for Flex applications. Adobe will undertake the required work to ensure Flash Builder is compatible with future releases of Flex SDK.

Previously communicated road map features, such as enhanced code editing, real-time error highlighting and compile-as-you-type support will be available to both ActionScript and Flex developers.

Is Flex SDK still a viable technology option for existing and new projects?

Absolutely. Flex SDK will continue to be developed, maintained and released as an open source project that Adobe actively contributes to.

You said that you believe HTML is the “long-term solution for enterprise applications” – can you clarify this statement?

HTML5 related technologies (comprising HTML, JavaScript and CSS) are becoming increasingly capable, such that we have every reason to believe that advances in expressiveness (e.g. Canvas), performance (e.g. VM and GPU acceleration in many browsers) and application-related capabilities (e.g. offline storage, web workers) will continue at a rapid pace. In time (and depending upon your application, it could be 3-5 years from now), we believe HTML5 could support the majority of use cases where Flex is used today.

However, Flex has now, and for many years will continue to have, advantages over HTML5 for enterprise application development – in particular:

Our announcements relating to changes in the way Flex SDK is developed do not change the fundamental value-add of Flex or make HTML5 suddenly more capable than it was last week.

We intend to make investments in HTML-related technologies, so that we can help advance HTML5 to make it suitable for enterprise applications.

Will Adobe provide migration tools to enable existing Flex applications to be converted to HTML/JavaScript?

We have undertaken some experimental work in this area, but remain unsure as to the viability of fully translating Flex-based content to HTML.

The Falcon JS cross-compiler, referenced above, represents this early work and we intend to contribute this to the open source project.

What happens next?

We are actively working on the callback proposal for incubating Flex SDK and BlazeDS at the Apache Software Foundation. Once the proposals have been accepted, both Adobe and community contributors can begin committing contributions. We will share an update when the callback proposal has been posted – we expect this to happen over the course of the next few weeks.

We are working on providing you with more detailed information relating to the open source contributions we are making, how you can contribute to Flex SDK and BlazeDS through Apache’s contribution model and our HTML5-related plans.

We’d like an opportunity to talk to as many Flex developers as possible in person about these changes – to that end, members of the Flex product team along with Adobe evangelists will be organizing a multi-city international tour to enable more direct discussions. Stay tuned for more information.

 

Topics: Adobe AIR, Announcements, Flex 4, Flex Builder | 1 Comment »

Adobe Sneak Peek Videos at MAX 2011

By Rich Tretola | October 17, 201114,033 views

Here are all of the sneak peek videos from Adobe MAX 2011. You don’t want to miss them::

LOCAL LAYER ORDERING – Weaving Layers

IMAGE DEBLURRING – WOW!

GPU PARALLELISM – Future of Pixel Bender?

VIDEO MESHES – 3D Fly-throughs of 2D Videos

MONOCLE – Profile with Telemetry

PIXEL NUGGETS – Visual Image Search

RUBBADUB – Synching external audio with a video

REVERSE DEBUGGING IN FLASH BUILDER – go back in debug sessions

AUTOMATIC SYNCHRONIZATION OF CROWD SOURCED VIDEOS – Time align videos from multiple sources

NEAR FIELD COMMUNICATION IN ADOBE AIR – Using NFC chips with Adobe AIR Native Extensions

INDESIGN LIQUID LAYOUT – Autoflow of layout per device/screen sizes

Topics: Announcements, MAX 2011 | No Comments »

Announcing: JMeter-AMF Load Test Plugin

By Rich Tretola | September 15, 201132,379 views

Have you ever tried to load test a Flash/Flex application that is using BlazeDS and AMF for its data communications?

If you have tried JMeter you have probably seen this error:

“Detected duplicate HTTP-based FlexSessions, generally due to the remote host disabling session cookies. Session cookies must be enabled to manage the client connection correctly.”

I am happy to say that my team member Ken Hill has created a open source JMeter plugin for load testing BlazeDS applications.

I highly suggest you check this new plugin out and support this project.

Here is some info:

This plugin gives JMeter the ability to load test applications using the AMF3 protocol. Main features:

His short list for immediate improvements include:

Topics: ActionScript 3, Announcements, BlazeDS, Flex | 6 Comments »


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